What’s on in February?

Written by Paula Nicol on January 22, 2016.

Voting age – Have your say!

Written by Paula Nicol on May 19, 2015.

With the recent elections generating so much discussion in Thanet. My thoughts turned to what must young people think about voting and their inability have their say on how the country is run over the next 5 years. We saw in Scotland recently during the referendum that 16 year olds were given the right to vote on an important issue affecting the country. In Austria, the minimum voting age is 16. How do young people get their voice heard in the UK? Perhaps, like Russell Brand, you think the voting system doesn’t make a difference, or that politics doesn’t affect you or it’s not important. Apparently ~60% of 16-24 year olds aren’t interested in politics. Is that true? I am not so sure. I think information provided by political parties is targeted at segments of society and turns the majority of the general public off. Remember only 70% of people eligible to vote in Thanet exercised that right!!

Andy



Remember our fallen

Written by west on May 8, 2015.

The day after Nazi Germany surrendered unconditionally to Western and Russian forces, thus marking Victory in Europe Day (VE Day) people up and down the country rejoiced.

To mark the 70th anniversary of VE Day, the Imperial War Museum has released archive footage of the celebrations on this day.

For everyone who contributed to the war efffort, we thank you

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/ve-day-70th-anniversary-historic-archive-footage-celebrations-buckingham-palace-1500269

 

 

 

 

 


1 in 10 young people experience mental health issues

Written by west on February 2, 2015.

1 in 10 young people experience mental health issues. It’s not about age, ethnicity, sexuality, gender or anything else. It can affect anyone, at anytime. Often, it can be scary and lonely place to find yourself in.

There are so few services around that support young people who are experiencing mental health issues that I thought I would share this great website – Time to Change.

The website has a dedicated section for young people, as well as advice for parents who are worried about their child.

The best bit is the young people’s blogs. This lets real young people talk about their experiences which not only starts the debate about what support is needed, but also lets other young people know they are not alone.

Take a look:

www.time-to-change.org.uk/youngpeople

And remember, a youth worker is a good place to start should you ever need someone to listen 🙂

Erin


Legal highs, are they safe?

Written by Paula Nicol on .

The short answer is “No”. Don’t be fooled by the pretty packaging, by the “cool” names, ‘Clockwork Orange’, ‘Bliss’ , ‘Karma’, ‘Silver Bullet’, to name just a few, and definitely don’t be fooled by the word ‘legal’. Just because a substance is sold as ‘legal’ doesn’t mean it’s safe or legal. In fact  you can’t really be sure of what’s in a ‘legal high’.’Legal highs’ can not be sold for human consumption, so they are often labeled as bath salts or plant food! Can you hear the alarm bells ringing yet? The long and the short of it is that ‘legal highs’ are designed to have similar effects to illegal drugs, but because the chemical substances in them haven’t yet been fully researched they are not yet controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.

‘Legal highs’ are usually sold in eye catching packaging in the form of powder or pills.Marketed as ‘party pills’ and ‘club drugs’ you may be forgiven for thinking they come risk free…. not so, look at the facts, not fit for human consumption, plant food, chemical substances that haven’t yet been researched to see what the dangers are and whether they should be made illegal.

 

‘Legal highs’ fall into 3 categories, stimulants, downers or hallucinogens, mimicking the effects of heroin, ecstasy or cannabis.With 60 people dying in the UK last year from taking ,legal highs, and 97 in 2012, fears are that the death rate will overtake that linked to heroin and top 400 by 2016.

‘Legal highs’ rarely have the same composition more that once, the contents may vary greatly, therefore the effects will vary greatly, you increase the risk to yourself if you combine them with alcohol, or any legal or illegal substance that causes a high, the risks can be unpredictable.

So to answer the original question, no, ‘legal highs’ are not safe , these drugs haven’t been tested for human consumption yet, so effectively users are human guinea pigs.

Life is already too short to take a chance on it, stay safe.

For further information on legal highs:

http://knowthescore.info/drugs-a-z/legal-highs#accordian-4

http://www.talktofrank.com/drug/legal-highs

http://www.nhs.uk/Livewell/drugs/Pages/legalhighs.aspx

 


Your views

Written by George Andrew on January 26, 2015.

At the Westgate Youth Project we always welcome your views and feedback. So get in touch and let us know what you think and what you want to do. Or even pop along and find out what we are up to!